The Encyclopedia of House Plants

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Stephanotis

Family: Asclepiadaceae.

This plant is available in our partner's store!

Stephanotis floribunda Common name(s): Floradora, Madagascar jasmine
Stephanotis The name derives from the Greek 'stephanos' crown and 'otis' ear which refers to the arrangement of the stamens in the flower which (supposedly) are ear shaped. Genus of 5-15 species of evergreen, woody-stemmed climbers from tropical woodland in Africa. They are grown for their strongly perfumed, waxy, tubular, usually white flowers. Leaves are opposite, ovate to elliptic, and leathery. Stephanotis is a beautiful but difficult plant - it hates sudden changes in temperature, needs constant cool conditions in winter and is attractive to scale and mealy bug. The stems of Stephanotis can reach 10 ft or more, but is usually sold twined around a wire hoop. The heavily-scented waxy flowers appear in summer.
Growing conditions Watering and misting Propagation
Average warmth in summer - minimum 55F in winter.Brightly lit spot. Keep well away from direct sunlight. Grow in soilless or soil-based potting mix. Keep compost moist at all times but never waterlogged. Reduce watering in winter. Use soft, tepid water. Misting is necessary. Take semi-ripe stem cuttings in spring and summer. Use a rooting hormone and provide bottom heat. Sow seed at 64-70 F (18-21 C) in spring.

User-submitted additions and corrections:

Zana
Lithuania
19th Sep 2005
Hi, everywhere it is written only about flowers of Stephanotis, but anywhere about its fruit. Because this summer after flowering my flower gave some kind of fruit lokking like mango, the size is the same big. Is that usual thing for this kind of flower? I don't know... Because there are no information about it....
Deb
USA
29th Sep 2005
My Jasmine plant also produced "fruit" this summer after blooming. I finally found some info about them. They are seed pods. You need to allow the pods to dry on the plant and then break open to collect the seeds. Sow them indoors before last frost.
Diane
USA
28th Nov 2006
my plant is growing outside in Southern (Long Beach) California - got one of these fruits too! What a surprise!
kara
16th Apr 2007
My stephanotis loves a light watering of seaweed and fish emulsion with a drop of superthrive.
Pat
USA
1st Jun 2008
I live in San Diego and have a madagascar jasmine that's at least 10 years old. This year it produced an egg-shaped fruit for the first time, and I am so pleased to find out what it is from your website....a seed pod, which is what I suspected but couldn't find anything about it anywhere else online.
Therese
San Diego
13th Jun 2008
I was loking for information regarding what the "fruit" on my stephanotis was, and was very happy to find it here. I thought it might be a seed pod also, and can't wait to try growing some from seed. What heavenly plant!
manaolana
16th Jun 2008
Thankyou for the information regarding propogation. I am in Hawaii and see the stephanotis growing around the neighborhood, but was wondering where I could get it or how to propogate it. I am going to go cut some and place in some potting soil along w/ some rutone.
Usha
Barbados
9th Aug 2008
I live in the tropics and have quite a few very mature and large Stephanotis plants in my garden. Some have become very leggy and I have been trying to find out how to prune them. No-where could I find any advice about pruning the plants in a climate where there is no dormant season. Any-one out there have any ideas? Can't imagine it's a good idea to cut into the old wood. P;ease let me know if you can give me ideas. Thanks.
chas
8th Sep 2008
I also have a Stephanotis that has maybe twenty of these seed pods. I cut one open the other day and the seeds did not look ready. I am going to leave the rest of the pods on until they dry. This Stephanotis is climbing one of my Plumeria trees which also puts off seed pods of the same sort. In the very near future I am going to rebuild my fence, so we will see how hardy these plants are. ALOHA From Oahu
Mari
Suffolk. UK
24th Jan 2009
Stephanotis floribunda will occasionally produce longish, fleshy fruits particularly during warm summers. The fruit may reach 10cm (4in) or more in length and have been described as resembling a large pear, although they are not edible. The fruit take several months to ripen and if necessary, they can be picked and placed in a warm situation to encourage ripening. Once the fruits are fully ripe, they will begin to split and turn brown. At this stage, the two halves can be pulled apart, to reveal a central mass of flattened seeds, which have a silky plume of white hairs, attached to one end. Store the seeds overwinter in cool, dry, frost-free conditions. Sow them thinly in spring, covering lightly with compost, in a temperature of about 20-24°c (68-75°F). Sow plenty of seeds, if space permits, as seed viability may be low.

Barb
London UK
3rd Mar 2009
I have a Stephanotis that recently the leaves have started to curl. I was given it about 1 year ago, it is approx. 4-5 years old & was never maintained properly i.e. it has never been pruned so is a bit overgrown. Anyone got any ideas as to what I can do to get it healthy again & stop the leaf curl/twist?
Ori
Israel
3rd Apr 2009
Hi Barb
Young leaves growing curly are usually an indication of over-watering. Remember that the soil of the Stephanotis should be moist, not wet. In the winter, watering should be reduced so that the soil is *almost* dry between watering.
Alan Stewart
Almeria Spain
14th Apr 2009
I live in the south eastern part of Spain we have the only desert in Europe about 40 kms away it is a perfect place to grow Stephenotis my old plant had fruit last year which I dried off then planted the seeds and I now have six new healthy plants
Dierdra
Los Angeles, CA.
1st May 2009
My Stephanotis is about four years old. I was pruning it today and found a seed pod to my great surprise; I didn't know Stephanotis grew seed pods, and I certainly didn't expect it to be the size it was! I live in a dry, almost desert-like climate; the vine is on our patio where it gets shade and some indirect sun, and it is doing well.
George
southern California
21st May 2009
hello, everybody, me and my friend just bought our very own madagasgar jasmine yesterday. I just want some inputs from those who either knows someone or lives in southern California(preferably those who lives in L.A. and San Diego area). Someone mentioned that this jasmine needs minimum of 55 degree F in winter. The temperature during the winter time sometime goes down to ~45 degree(like few months ago). So I just want to see what's everyone's experience is like especially if you plant your M. Jasmine outside. I don't want to plant the jasmine in the ground if it can't survive through winter.

Thanks
galiya
USA, NJ
21st May 2009
To George: Stephanotis will die if the temperature will fall below 50F. I have one in my Florida room this winter (it is 48 degrees and above in that room), and the plant did not survive.
George
southern California
23rd May 2009
hmmm....maybe where one get the Jasmine makes difference...I seen at least 3 site says temp. below 40F should be avoided. So it seems they probably should be ok with the winter here where I live.
Bird lover
Orange County, CA
27th Jun 2009
I have a lovely stephanotis vine growing on a trellis against a brick wall. It has seed pods every year & I have never trimmed it. I have not had any success growing new plants from the seeds, but will try again. No one has mentioned that this plant is related to milk weed, which explains the seed pods.
Linda
7th Jul 2009
The fruit you are seeing is actually a seed pod it needs to remain on the plant at least 6 months for ripening
Marty Harper
Naples, Florida
31st Jul 2009
Stephanotis grows fine in the ground here. It is usually planted where the roots and trunk are protected from full sun and allowed to climb. We had a low temp of 28F for several hours with a light frost and only a little leaf burn occured. The seed pod should be left on the plant until it starts to open. If seeds are sown immediately you will get great germination results. Most people overwater in winter when growing indoors which sets up phytophthora root disease which is eventually fatal.
karen
usa
27th Aug 2009
My stephanotis easily survived 30 degree F temps last winter, uncovered, although we did turn the sprinklers on. I have it wired to a 6ft standard board fence on the southeast side of my house in Central Florida. It is semi-shaded by oaks with a yellow flowering allamanda and a 15ft tall firebush as neighbors. It has been in the ground for about 3 years and this year, right now, is producing fruit. I fertilize with miracle grow in the spring and scatter some ozmocote around about when I think about it and keep the weeds at bay with bagged mulch and hand weeding. It is a beautiful slow grower with buds that take an eternity to open (if you are waiting). A glorious scent is the reward. ENJOY!
ADDS
canary islands,fuerteventura
21st Sep 2009
good to know i have all so have astephanotis it has a large fruit on it about the size of a mango didnt know what it was till now not only the fruit but the plant .it seems to grow well in the heat this year is a hot one in 40s and its the first time its had fruit may be a good thing
Mary
USA
21st Oct 2009
George: Your Stephanotis will be fine outdoors in Los Angeles. I've had mine outside on the south side of the house and planted in front of a stone wall, which keeps its roots in the shade while the trellis keeps its tips in the sun. They're both very happy and this year one even produced a seed pod.
Tricia: I would bet that you're giving it too much water because it sounds like you're watering more than I am and I'm in Southern California. It's such a great plant and so hardy here.
Jon, Bergen, Norway
Bergen, Norway
25th Apr 2010
We have had the Stephanotis (in Scandinavia called "perfumed vine")for many years and it produced a fruit (like an avocado in shape) aboat a year ago. I planted seeds in a pot, left it in the window sill a month ago but still no plant showing. Have read from Australien sites that propagation from seed could take up to several months. I'll wait and see.
Bob
Florida
2nd Jun 2010
Norway Jon: My vine produced 3 seed pods last year. They never did dry up or open up. I cut one in half and germinated the 50 or so seeds in a plastic container filled with a moist paper towel. Every one of the seeds germinatedin a week. Now I have 3-6CM plants growing in less than a month.
Would suggest you dig up the pod and start with the seeds.
marilyn
Cyprus
29th Aug 2010
our 2 yr old Stephanotis is planted in full sun (& wind) on our patio, in a large pot. This year we've had flowering for the past 3 months + 2x mango-size seed pods. The pot is self draining, but since this is growing season with temps up to 40C, we keep it well watered.
Only fertilizer used this year is Urea! We look forward to success with it's offspring!!
Deborah
Spain
26th Oct 2010
We moved into our house last year and adopted the Stephanotis on the wrought ironwork on our terrace. It seems to love the all day sunshine and has now produced two fruits. We water it regularly but it doesn´t have tepid water, just what´s available and seems to love it´s conditions.
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